Dieback fight back – protect plant-life on our coast


It takes a mere few months for beautiful native plants to become infected and killed by the root-rot fungus known as Phytophthora Dieback.

Healthy Grass Trees won’t stay green for long with infected neighbours nearby

What is the effect of the root-rot fungus?

The root-rot fungus works by spreading through moist soil and quickly infecting and killing a number of native plants – from the well-known ‘Grass Trees’ particularly prevalent in the Great Otway National Park, to coastal Banksias and even large trees.

How does the disease spread?

If you have walked through the Great Otway National Park, you probably would have come across easily recognizable Grass Trees.  The effect of the fungus on these Grass Trees, as well as other plant, is also recognizable. From beautiful blue-green fronds to tangled brown in just a few months – the rapid effect is devastating.

What is being done about it?

The Friends of Point Addis together with the Victorian National Parks Association and Deakin University are currently monitoring the Grass Trees in Ironbark Basin.

Parks Victoria have set up stands for brushing and washing shoes and bike tyres around the Ironbark Basin area.

How can you get involved?

The Friends of Point Addis are this month holding an information session for any concerned locals, landowners and visitors to learn more about the disease and what they can do to help stop the spread of disease.

Register to attend the workshop by emailing (bronwynspark@gmail.com) or calling Bronwyn Spark on 5263 2224. Then come on down to the Ironbark Basin car park off Point Addis Rd Saturday July 21 to learn more in the free Workshop.

Remember – we all need to pull together to stop the fungus from infecting our native flora!

This story featured in the Surf Coast Time’s fortnightly Green the Coast Column.

Do you have any more ideas about how we can protect our native flora and fauna? Let us know!

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