Community Conservation Network forges ahead


Have you heard of the Otway Community Conservation Network (OCCN)?  We have blogged about the  group before, just after it formed (check out the previous blog here).

Below is a video introducing the OCCN:

The group has been moving ahead in leaps and bounds since they first came on the scene, working to reduce the threat of weed species on native bush in the Otways, and raise awareness of the impacts of weeds in the community.

Some recent achievements include the mapping in August this year of all known infestations of Boneseed and Bridal Creeper.  Infestations were then prioritised and a series of community working bees and  contractor works were undertaken during September and October.

Since the OCCN’s  inception in March 2011, over 600 hectares of vegetation containing Boneseed and over three quarters of the known Bridal Creeper infestations across the network were treated – a huge achievement.

Additionally, so far the network has assisted more than 40 private landholders with resources and advice to control Boneseed and Bridal Creeper.

Below is a video of some OCCN Boneseed works:

Maps of treated sites:

View treated sites for Boneseed on the interactive map here.

View treated sites for Bridal Creeper on our interactive map here.

The Network is asking for the community to report any infestations  that are not on the maps!  To report and infestation email occn@occn.org.au.

Resources and related maps and documents:

More information, including information about how the current works are being prioritised within the network
you can read the Otway Community Conservation Network 2011 – 2012 Works, photo monitoring and more, visit the OCCN website.

What’s next for the OCCN?
Boneseed and Bridal Creeper control works will continue on into next year. There are funding opportunities coming up through the state government Communities for Nature Grants which will give the network an opportunity to continue with current programs and look at expanding into new conservation issues.

The network is finding its place in the natural resource management space of the Otways and is building important partnerships between the community, agency groups and management bodies.

Have you been involved with the OCCN? What do you think about their work? Let us know!

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