Weeding out coastal invaders


A new conservation network is weeding out threats to native vegetation along the coast and you can help starting with your own backyard.

The Otway Community and Conservation Network (OCCN) is working to reduce the threat of two invasive weed species, Boneseed Chrysanthemoides monbilifera and Bridal Creeper Asparagus asparagoides.

Otway Community Conservation Network Introduction


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OCCN project facilitator Luke Hynes says Boneseed and Bridal Creeper are regarded as two of the worst weeds in Australia due to their invasiveness and potential for spread.

“Boneseed and Bridal Creeper are emerging weeds in this area and it is essential that we control these weeds before they become established,” said Mr Hynes.

Department of Sustainability and Environment (DSE) Officer Craig Clifford says that the weeds will be removed from public and private land, giving landholders an important role to play in controlling the weeds.

“We have been getting on top of infestations in some of the DSE managed areas but this is a great opportunity to assist adjacent private landholders,” said Mr Clifford.

“We have been getting on top of infestations in some of the DSE managed areas but this is a great opportunity to assist adjacent private landholders.”

September is the peak flowering time for both species and the network is preparing for a busy control period.

“September is the best time to control both of these species.  The yellow Boneseed flowers in particular are very easy to spot and control.

Boneseed flowers, one of Austrlia’s most dreaded weeds.

“It is important that coastal residents look out for these weeds and are proactive in removing these weeds from their backyards,” said Mr Hynes.

“It is important that coastal residents look out for these weeds and are proactive in removing these weeds from their backyards.”

During the early flowering period of August, OCCN mapped all known infestations of Boneseed and Bridal Creeper across the project area, which includes land from Anglesea to Port Campbell and through to Colac.

OCCN volunteers removing Boneseed on the Surf Coast

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‘’With infestations in the project area mapped we can get stuck into control works before the plants set seed in October,’’ said Mr Hynes.

The mapping is guiding OCCN during the prioritisation process which will determine the most important sites for weed removal.

High priority sites include smaller, outlying infestations around Wye River, Kennett River, Borongarook, Deans Marsh and Bambra and heavier infestations between Lorne and Anglesea.

OCCN members Jack Pascoe, Michael Callahan, Gary White, John Wilson, Georgie Beale, Peter Hay and Ulric Orr.

Great Ocean Road Coast Committee (GORCC) Conservation Officer Georgie Beale says that GORCC will be removing weeds in Anglesea with the help of funding from OCCN.

“OCCN has done a wonderful job coordinating all the conservation groups which was a large job in itself,” said Ms Beale.

For more information contact Luke Hynes PH: 0406 113 438 or Email: occn@occn.org.au

This column bought to you by the Great Ocean Road Coast Committee (GORCC). To view the GORCC website click here.

This column appeared in the Surf Coast Times on the 6 September 2011.

For more information:

Boneseed

Bonseed infestation map

Bridal Creeper

Bridal Creeper infestation map

The Otway Community Conservation Network

Are you an OCCN volunteer?

Would you be interested in helping to weed out the Boneseed and Bridal Creeper infestations?

Have you seen any infestations not included in the mapped area?

We would greatly appreciate your feedback!

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